ARTÍCULO

Eco-physiological response of Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. to increased atmospheric ammonia concentrations in a forest agrosystem

Autores: Izquieta Rojano, Sheila; López Aizpún, María; Irigoyen Iparrea, Juan José; Santamaría Ulecia, Jesús Miguel; Santamaría Elola, Carolina; Lasheras Adot, María Esther; Ochoa-Hueso, R.; Elustondo Valencia, David
Título de la revista: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT
ISSN: 0048-9697
Volumen: 619-620
Páginas: 883 - 895
Fecha de publicación: 2018
Resumen:
Ammonia (NH3) emissions are linked to eutrophication, plant toxicity and ecosystem shifts from N to P limitation. Bryophytes are key components of terrestrial ecosystems, yet highly sensitive to N deposition. Hence, physiological responses of mosses may be indicative of NH3-related impacts, and thus useful to foresee future ecosystem damages and establish atmospheric Critical Levels (CLEs). In this work, samples of Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. were seasonally collected along a well-defined NH3 concentration gradient in an oak woodland during a one-year period. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of tissue chemistry, stoichiometry, metabolic enzymes, antioxidant response, membrane damages, photosynthetic pigments, soluble protein content and N and C isotopic fractionation. Our results showed that all the physiological parameters studied (except P, K, Ca and C) responded to the NH3 gradient in predictable ways, although the magnitude and significance of the response were dependent on the sampling season, especially for enzymatic activities and pigments content. Nutritional imbalances, membrane damages and disturbance of cellular C and N metabolism were found as a consequence to NH3 exposure, being more affected the mosses more exposed to the barn atmosphere. These findings suggested significant implications of intensive farming for the correct functioning of oak woodlands and highlighted the importance of seasonal dynamics in the study of key physiological processes related to photosynthesis, mosses nutrition and responses to oxidative stress. Finally, tissue N showed the greatest potential for the identification of NH3-related ecological end points (estimated CLE = 3.5 mu g m(-3)), whereas highly scattered physiological responses, although highly sensitive, were not suitable to that end.