ARTÍCULO

Continuation of Unintended Pregnancy

Autores: Ayerbe, L. (Autor de correspondencia); Perez-Pinar, M.; López del Burgo, Cristina; Burgueno, E.
Título de la revista: LINACRE QUARTERLY
ISSN: 0024-3639
Volumen: 86
Número: 2 - 3
Páginas: 161 - 167
Fecha de publicación: 2019
Lugar: WOS
Resumen:
Background: Forty-four percent of all pregnancies worldwide are unintended. Induced abortion has drawn a lot of attention from clinicians and policy makers, and the care for women requesting it has been covered in many publications. However, abortion challenges the values of many women, is associated with negative emotions, and has its own medical complications. Women have the right to discuss their unintended pregnancy with a clinician and receive elaborate information about other options to deal with it. Continuing an unintended pregnancy, and receiving the necessary care and support for it, is also a reproductive right of women. However, the provision of medical information and support required for the continuation of an unintended pregnancy has hardly been approached in the medical literature. Objective: This review presents a clinical approach to unintentionally pregnant patients and describes the information and support that can be offered for the continuation of the unintended pregnancy. Discussion: Clinicians should approach patients with an unintended pregnancy with a sympathetic tone in order to provide the most support and present the most complete options. A complete clinical history can help frame the problem and identify concerns related to the pregnancy. Any underlying medical or obstetric problems can be discussed. A social history, that includes the personal support from the patient's partner, parents, and siblings, can be taken. Doctors should also be alert of possible cases of violence from the partner or child abuse in adolescent patients. Finally, the clinician can provide the first information regarding the social care available and refer the patients for further support. For women who continue an unintended pregnancy, clinicians should start antenatal care immediately. Conclusion: Unintentionally pregnant women deserve a supportive and complete response from their clinicians, who should inform about, and sometimes activate, all the resources available for the continuation of unintended pregnancy. Forty-four percent of all pregnancies worldwide are unintended. Induced abortion has drawn a lot of attention and the care for women requesting it has been covered in many publications. However, abortion challenges the values of many women, is associated with negative emotions, and has its own medical complications. Women have the right to discuss their unintended pregnancy with a clinician and receive elaborate information about other options to deal with it. Continuing an unintended pregnancy, and receiving the necessary care and support for it, is also a reproductive right of women. However, the provision of medical information and support required for the continuation of an unintended pregnancy has hardly been approached in the medical literature. This review presents a clinical approach to unintentionally pregnant patients and describes the information and support that can be offered for the continuation of the unintended pregnancy. Clinicians should approach patients with an unintended pregnancy with a sympathetic tone. A complete clinical history can help frame the problem and identify concerns related to the pregnancy. Any underlying medical or obstetric problems can be discussed. A social history, that includes the personal support from the patient's partner, parents, and siblings, can be taken. Doctors should also be alert of possible cases of violence from the partner or child abuse in adolescent patients. Finally, the clinician can provide the first information regarding the social care available and refer the patients for further support. For women who continue an unintended pregnancy, clinicians should start antenatal care immediately.