Nuestros investigadores

Andrew Charles Breeze 

Publicaciones científicas más recientes (desde 2010)

Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: MODERN LANGUAGE REVIEW
ISSN 0026-7937  Vol. 114  Nº 1  2019  págs. 107 - 108
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: MODERN LANGUAGE REVIEW
ISSN 0026-7937  Vol. 114  Nº 2  2019  págs. 346 - 347
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SELIM JOURNAL OF THE SPANISH SOCIETY FOR MEDIAEVAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
ISSN 1132-631X  Vol. 24  Nº 1  2019  págs. 149 - 156
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: ROCZNIKI HUMANISTYCZNE
ISSN 0035-7707  Vol. 67  Nº 11  2019  págs. 7 - 16
Cirencester, some fifty kilometres west of Oxford, is an English town on the site of a Roman city. Even though its original name (after Ptolemy in the second century CE) was supposedly Corinium, giving the Ciren- of Cirencester, this has never had a satisfying etymology. However, Welsh car 'friend' or Irish cara 'friend' may now permit emendation of Corinium to Carinium 'place of Carinos,' a personal form known elsewhere. It means 'little beloved one, little friend' and is compatible with development to Ciren-. If so, the mystery surrounding Cirencester, capital of the Dobunni, will be solved. The first Carinium would be the nearby Iron Age citadel of Bagendon Dykes. When the Romans occupied the area, they founded a city five kilometres away, transferring local people to it and applying the name of the old settlement to the new one, as elsewhere in Britain (Colchester, St Albans, Wroxeter). Modem Cirencester will thus (it seems) be called after Carinus or Carinos, an otherwise unknown Briton who occupied land at Bagendon some two millennia ago.
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: VOPROSY ONOMASTIKI
ISSN 1994-2400  Vol. 16  Nº 3  2019  págs. 205 - 211
York, a cathedral city in the north of England, was the Eburacum or Colonia Eburacensis of Roman Britain. Its name has usually been explained from Irish iubhar 'yew tree' (or alternatively from Welsh efwr 'hogweed') and so 'place where yew trees grow'; or else as containing the British(-Latin) personal name Eburus plus the suffix -aco-, and so 'estate of Eburus' (with commentators wavering between the two). The author provides an overview of the etymological interpretations suggested in literarure and adduces arguments in favour of the second explanation. The yew tree (Taxus baccata) is typically found in dry woodland and scrub, often on chalk. It hates wet soil, which York has in plenty, for it occupies a low-lying site at the junction of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. Damp and subject to flooding, York is no place for yew trees. A direct link with yews may be rejected and a sense 'estate of Eburus' accepted with confidence, even if Eburus (somewhat confusingly) itself meant 'he who lives by a yew tree'. The implications of topographical factors for the name of York may be recalled on other dubious etymologies in Watts's 2004 dictionary, including 'port with deep water' for Dunwich, 'water, pool' for London, 'fort of a breast-shaped hill' for Manchester, or 'fork, watershed' for the Isle of Wight.
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE JOURNAL OF LITERARY ONOMASTICS
ISSN 2169-5865  Vol. 7  Nº 1  2019  págs. 12 - 27
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: MODERN LANGUAGE REVIEW
ISSN 0026-7937  Vol. 113  2018  págs. 638 - 639
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: MODERN LANGUAGE REVIEW
ISSN 0026-7937  Vol. 113  Nº 1  2018  págs. 223 - 224
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: MODERN LANGUAGE REVIEW
ISSN 0026-7937  Vol. 113  Nº 4  2018  págs. 851 - 852
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: MODERN PHILOLOGY
ISSN 0026-8232  Vol. 116  Nº 1  2018  págs. E40 - E42
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HISTORIC SOCIETY OF LANCASHIRE AND CHESHIRE. TRANSACTIONS
ISSN 0140-332X  Vol. 167  2018  págs. 1 - 19
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 44  2018  págs. 37 - 46
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: VOPROSY ONOMASTIKI
ISSN 1994-2400  Vol. 15  Nº 3  2018  págs. 202 - 211
Doncaster, known to the Romans as Danum, is a town on the River Don, Yorkshire. Its British-Latin name (deriving from that of the river) has been obscure: although interpretations 'wet' or 'bold' or 'flowing' have been proposed from alleged parallels with the Danube, Dnieper, Don, or Rhone of the European continent, they are inconclusive, because they lack equivalents in Brittonic. A new etymology is needed. The one suggested here is 'gift; gifted one' or even 'she who brings gifts' (designating a river nymph). It is supported directly by the Welsh word dawn 'gift' and indirectly by the River Annan of Scotland, recorded in British-Latin as Anava, a form related to Welsh anau, 'wealth, riches, largess, bounty, gift' and presumably reflecting Celtic belief in the stream as a bountiful goddess. The Yorkshire Don (like the River Don of Tyneside) would thus have a name explicable in purely Celtic terms. Reference to lndoIranian, legitimately applied to continental rivers including the Russian Don and Dnieper, can here be dropped. Besides this, Doncaster can be proved as unrelated both to the "Cair Dann" of Ilistoria Brittonum's Twenty-Eight Cities of Britain (where the toponym is surely a corniption of Cali-Dam or Cardiff), and to the goddess Don of the twelfth-century Four Branches of the Mabinogi. On the other hand, the Yorkshire Don can be shown as a namesake not only of the River Don of Tyneside, but of the River Doon in south-west Scotland
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: STUDIA CELTICA POSNANIENSIA
ISSN 2451-4160  Vol. 3  Nº 1  2018  págs. 47 - 62
In a previous issue of this journal, Natasha Sumner of Harvard claimed of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi that the ¿exact date of composition for the text is not known¿; she yet quoted Professor Catherine McKenna, also of Harvard, for the tales as certainly predating the Fall of Gwynedd in 1282. A response to Professor Sumner¿s comment thus has three functions. It cites publications on the question from 1897 to 2018; reveals the scholarly disagreement therein; but concludes with evidence to put the tales in the 1120s or early 1130s
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 44  2018  págs. 47 - 59
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 44  2018  págs. 27 - 36
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: MODERN LANGUAGE REVIEW
ISSN 0026-7937  Vol. 112  Nº 2  2017  págs. 479 - 480
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 42  Nº 1  2017  págs. 4 - 6
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 42  Nº 2  2017  págs. 44 - 49
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 42  Nº 1  2017  págs. 13 - 15
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 43  2017  págs. 72 - 78
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: VOPROSY ONOMASTIKI
ISSN 1994-2400  Vol. 14  Nº 1  2017  págs. 56 - 65
The paper focuses on the problem of identification of Caer Urfe, one of the Twenty-Eight Cities of Britain listed by John Leland (d. 1552) from Henry of Huntingdon (d. 1155) after the ninth-century Historia Brittonum. Many of the twenty-eight have defied identification; but Leland¿s proposal of Tynemouth for Caer Urfe is now maintained by archaeologists on Tyneside, in the north of England. The author argues that Caer Urfe is to be associated with St Cynfarch, near Chepstow, in south-east Wales. It is one of ten Welsh religious communities named in the catalogue together with cathedral cities and ancient British hillforts, none of them on Tyneside. The paper also examines the case of Arbeia, recorded by Notitia Dignitatum as the name of the Roman fort at South Shields, Tyneside. The author shows that Arbeia has no link with Caer Urfe, nor does it mean `Arabs,¿ supposedly relating to the garrisoning there after 300 CE of troops from Iraq. Many Roman forts in Britain were called after streams close to them; Arbeia is hence best understood on the basis of Welsh erfin `turnips,¿ also the name of a stream near Aberystwyth, as `<fort by a> stream noted for wild turnips¿. The article is supplemented with an appendix containing a list of the twenty-eight cities from Leland¿s catalogue, with toponyms rectified after the twelfth-century Book of Llandaff and other Welsh documents
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles (Autor de correspondencia)
Revista: VOPROSY ONOMASTIKI
ISSN 1994-2400  Vol. 14  Nº 3  2017  págs. 204 - 209
The Goodwin Sands are a hazard to shipping in the English Channel. Their name means "good friend" and is often taken as euphemistic or propitiatory. Alternatively, in a legend with Celtic parallels, the sands have been regarded as an island which belonged to Earl Godwine (d. 1053), but was drowned by natural disaster. Science shows, however, that the Goodw ins have never been land within historic times. Their name can thus have nothing to do with Godwine of Wessex. Nor is it an attempt to flatter a feared entity. The author argues that the name should be explained instead by reference to the Downs, an anchorage between the sands and the Kent coast. Dangerous to mariners, the Goodwins are nevertheless a natural breakwater, by creating the calm water of the Downs, they really were a "good friend" to seafarers. The interpretation has an equivalent with the Manacles, "stones of refuge," off the Cornish coast. The Goodwins and Manacles have wrecked many ships, but saved far more, the first as a barrier against storms in the Channel. the second as one against storms in the Atlantic. Their names will hence display the same naming pattern.
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY MAGAZINE
ISSN 0262-6608  Vol. 110  2017  págs. 222 - 223
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: VOPROSY ONOMASTIKI
ISSN 1994-2400  Vol. 13  Nº 1  2016  págs. 30 - 42
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 10  2016  págs. 315 - 319
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SCRIPTA DE MARIA
ISSN 0210-6620  Vol. 13  2016  págs. 267 - 279
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE JOURNAL OF LITERARY ONOMASTICS
ISSN 2169-5865  Vol. 5  Nº 1  2016  págs. 1 - 16
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078172X  Vol. 53  Nº 1  2016  págs. 138 - 145
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 10  2016  págs. 302 - 308
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 42  2016  págs. 71 - 81
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Onomastica
Revista: TRANSACTIONS OF THE WORCESTERSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY
ISSN 0143-2389  Vol. 25  2016  págs. 155 - 162
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: VOPROSY ONOMASTIKI
ISSN 1994-2400  Vol. 13  Nº 1  2016  págs. 30 - 42
The article focuses on the localization of the martyrdom of the British saints Aaron and Julius, known of solely from Gildas, writing in the early 530s. His remarks were taken up by Bede (d. 737), so that the two saints have never been forgotten, their cult surviving to this day. The author provides a detailed survey of discussion of Aaron and Julius over the centuries, and argues that their martyrdom was neither at Caerleon (in south-east Wales) nor Chester (in north-west England), as suggested by numerous scholars, but at Leicester, another major city of Roman Britain. Working from epigraphic sources and taking into account ancient models of naming, the author attempts a reinterpretation of Legionum urbs in the original texts by emending it to Legorum urbs ¿city of the Legores,¿ the Celtic people of the Leicester region. The latter, by the time of Gildas, was occupied by the Angles, while the city itself was abandoned, which may explain Gildas¿s remarks, otherwise unclear if one identifies Legionum urbs with Caerleon or Chester. The author adduces both historical and linguistic arguments for his proposal and shows that it sheds new light on the history of early British Christianity
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078172X  Vol. 53  Nº 2  2016  págs. 161 - 172
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HERTFORDSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY
ISSN 1752-7406  Vol. 17  2016  págs. 97 - 98
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 52  Nº 1  2015  págs. 9 - 19
The article discusses about issues in Northern history focusing on the location of Gwen Ystrad where king Urien Rheged lead Britons and repelled an attack by Pictish sea-raiders. It is noted that early Brythonic poet Taliesin described this battle in his poem. Topics include Welsh poetry and prose, poetic translations, analysis of early poetry by British scholar Rachel Bromwich, essays on Welsh tradition by Sir Idris Foster, and local government reforms in Great Britain
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 52  Nº 1  2015  págs. 9 - 19
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 52  Nº 2  2015  págs. 158 - 181
The twelve battles of Arthur listed by the ninth-century Historia Brittonum have been an intractable problem. This paper gives an outline of discussion past and present, before offering some conclusions on where the conflicts were and what they imply for the historical Arthur and Northern history in the sixth century; for it seems that each of these engagements ( excepting Mount Badon) can be located in Northumberland or southern Scotland, with the implication that Arthur himself was a North Briton and specifically a Strathclyder
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE JOURNAL OF LITERARY ONOMASTICS
ISSN 2169-5865  Vol. 4  Nº 1  2015  págs. 20 - 30
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 61  Nº 2  2014  págs. 201 - 202
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NEOPHILOLOGUS
ISSN 0028-2677  Vol. 98  Nº 2  2014  págs. 337 - 341
Marks on the Maiden's skin in the Middle English poem Pearl have been taken to indicate that she died of plague. Because outbreaks of plague in fourteenth-century England can be dated, this suggests that Pearl may date from the early 1390s
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 61  Nº 2  2014  págs. 201 - 202
The potential meaning of the term 'saggard' in the York play of the 'Death of Christ' is discussed. The term was commonly construed as a noun from the word 'sag.' However, it could also denote the mocking of Christ as a 'sagari,' the Irish and Scottish Gaelic word for priest
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 51  Nº 1  2014  págs. 177 - 182
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 5  2014  págs. 137 - 138
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: EOS: COMMENTARII SOCIETATIS PHILOLOGIAE POLONORUM
ISSN 0012-7825  Vol. 101  Nº 2  2014  págs. 311 - 323
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE JOURNAL OF LITERARY ONOMASTICS
ISSN 2169-5865  Vol. 3  Nº 1  2014  págs. 1 - 4
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 5  2014  págs. 146 - 147
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NEOPHILOLOGUS
ISSN 0028-2677  Vol. 98  Nº 2  2014  págs. 337 - 341
Marks on the Maiden's skin in the Middle English poem Pearl have been taken to indicate that she died of plague. Because outbreaks of plague in fourteenth-century England can be dated, this suggests that Pearl may date from the early 1390s
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 51  Nº 1  2014  págs. 177 - 182
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 5  2014  págs. 157 - 159
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 39  2013  págs. 94 - 98
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 39  2013  págs. 83 - 93
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 3  2013  págs. 84 - 85
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Tregole Revisited
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 3  2013  págs. 97 - 99
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 50  Nº 2  2013  págs. 170 - 179
The ninth-century Historia Brittonum states that the first wife of Oswiu (d. 670) of Northumbria was Rhiainfellt, daughter of 'Royth', the son of Rhun. It states also that Rhun son of Urien baptised Edwin of Northumbria. That would have been in 627. But because neither fact is mentioned by Bede, historians have impugned both from Victorian times to the present. A survey of discussion hence tells us much of modern historians' attitudes; analysis of material suggests that the Welsh sources here tell a truth suppressed by Bede. The Welsh version would be confirmed by textual emendation of the name 'Royth', which is corrupt. It is surely Old Welsh Reyth, giving Rhaith 'right, justness' in today's Welsh, an appropriate name for a British cleric's son, as opposed to the ferociously warlike ones usually possessed by the early Celtic ruling class
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 3  2013  págs. 80 - 81
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 50  Nº 1  2013  págs. 115 - 119
The article discusses the Battle of Chester fought in Northumbria, England between the English forces of Northumbria led by King Æthelfrith against the Britons of Wales dated alternately to 613 or 615. It considers the battle's conflicted historiography in accounts written by historians including Geoffrey of Monmouth, Charles Edwards, and Theophilus Evans. It focuses particularly to references to King Cetula, who fell during the battle. The author proposes that the name "Cetula" was actually the result of a scribal transposition and was actually meant to render the name Cetual, a period variant of the Welsh name Cadwal or Catgual, attributed as King Cadwal of Rhos
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SCRIPTA DE MARIA
ISSN 0210-6620  Vol. 10  2013  págs. 101 - 121
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY MAGAZINE
ISSN 0262-6608  Vol. 106  2013  págs. 263 - 264
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 1  2012  págs. 33 - 34
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE WELSH JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS HISTORY
ISSN 0967-3938  Vol. 7-8  2012  págs. 1 - 23
The article presents an exploration into the historiography and hagiography of the 5th-century Scottish Christian figure of Saint Ninian. Arguments are made asserting that St. Ninian did not exist as a historical person. Topics addressed include an overview of references to Ninian from historians Charles Edwards, W. Douglas Simpson, and Hartwell Jones; the absence of archaeological evidence, and scholastic criticism of the church history of Venerable Bede
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: ANTIQUARIES JOURNAL
ISSN 0003-5815  Vol. 92  2012  págs. 109 - 114
The location of Argistillum in the Ravenna Cosmography has been obscure. This paper uses linguistic and historical analysis to suggest that it was the Roman fort at Caersws, in the cantref (district) of Arwystli, still with a name relatable to Argistillum
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 49  Nº 1  2012  págs. 129 - 133
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 2  2012  págs. 65 - 66
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 49  Nº 1  2012  págs. 129 - 133
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 1  2012  págs. 4 - 6
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 2  2012  págs. 63 - 64
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Varia celtica
Revista: AUSTRALIAN CELTIC JOURNAL
ISSN 1030-2611  Vol. 10  2012  págs. 107 - 114
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 1  2012  págs. 17 - 19
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DENBIGHSHIRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TRANSACTIONS
ISSN 040-8844  Vol. 60  2012  págs. 9 - 18
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 2  2012  págs. 48 - 52
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 38  2012  págs. 89 - 135
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 49  Nº 2  2012  págs. 345 - 350
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: STUDIA CELTICA
ISSN 0081-6353  Vol. 46  2012  págs. 191 - 194
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE JOURNAL OF LITERARY ONOMASTICS
ISSN 2169-5865  Vol. 2  Nº 1  2012  págs. 1 - 9
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE WELSH JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS HISTORY
ISSN 0967-3938  Vol. 7-8  2012  págs. 199 - 211
The article presents discussion of the place names referenced within the 13th-century Welsh Christian poem "The Saints and Martyrs of Christendom," found within the Book of Taliesin codex. Introductory details are given outlining the difficulties inherent in interpreting the text due to numerous typographical and scribal errors. Suggestions are then given for deciphering several place names in connection to Biblical geography
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: RADNOR HISTORICAL SOCIETY. BULLETIN
ISSN 0483-8785  Vol. 82  2012  págs. 111 - 112
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 2  2012  págs. 44-44
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 41  Nº 2  2012  págs. 54 - 56
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: LEEDS STUDIES IN ENGLISH
ISSN 0075-8566  Vol. 43  2012  págs. 117 - 119
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE WELSH JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS HISTORY
ISSN 0967-3938  Vol. 6  2011  págs. 115 - 121
A literary criticism is presented on the Welsh ecclesiastical text "Braint Teilo" in the "Book of Llandaff," investigating the use and etymology of the term gundy. It is said that the word is derived from the Welsh word cun, which was used to refer to both lords and God, and that cundy means house of the Lord or church
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: STUDIA CELTICA
ISSN 0081-6353  Vol. 45  2011  págs. 203 - 209
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 10  2011  págs. 295 - 297
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 58  Nº 1  2011  págs. 118 - 118
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 37  2011  págs. 169 - 181
The article focuses on the places in West Midland, England which were all associated with English poet A.E. Housman. The British-Latin name of Worcester is highlighted which is the birthplace of Housman. The places Buildwas and Uricon are also emphasized which are mentioned in the collection of poems titled "A Shropshire Lad," by Housman
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 10  2011  págs. 298 - 301
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 58  Nº 2  2011  págs. 192 - 193
The article discusses the etymology of the Scots term 'in a rane', meaning 'continuously'. According to the author, it may be derived from the Gaelic 'rond' or 'ronn', meaning 'chain'
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: ENGLISH PLACE-NAME SOCIETY. JOURNAL
ISSN 1351-3095  Vol. 43  2011  págs. 71 - 74
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 10  2011  págs. 291 - 292
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE JOURNAL OF LITERARY ONOMASTICS
ISSN 2169-5865  Vol. 1  Nº 1  2011  págs. 5 - 8
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 58  Nº 3  2011  págs. 368 - 369
The article discusses the origin of the word 'slammakin', meaning 'slovenly female, slattern', commonly used in the 18th and 19th centuries
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 58  Nº 1  2011  págs. 56 - 56
The article discusses the possible meaning of the Hiberno-English word 'strone', which may be derived from the Irish word 'sruthán'.
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 48  Nº 1  2011  págs. 145 - 146
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Britons at morfe
Revista: TRANSACTIONS (STAFFORDSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY)
ISSN 1479-6368  Vol. 45  2011  págs. 107 - 108
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 10  2011  págs. 304 - 306
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SELIM JOURNAL OF THE SPANISH SOCIETY FOR MEDIAEVAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
ISSN 1132-631X  Nº 18  2011  págs. 165 - 168
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Nº 48  2011  págs. 147 - 152
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 10  2011  págs. 291 - 292
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: WILTSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY MAGAZINE
ISSN 0262-6608  Vol. 104  2011  págs. 256 - 257
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SELIM JOURNAL OF THE SPANISH SOCIETY FOR MEDIAEVAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
ISSN 1132-631X  Nº 18  2011  págs. 169 - 171
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SELIM JOURNAL OF THE SPANISH SOCIETY FOR MEDIAEVAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
ISSN 1132-631X  Nº 17  2010  págs. 175 - 180
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: QUAESTIO INSULARIS
ISSN 1745-8676  Vol. 11  2010  págs. 209 - 214
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SCOTTISH LANGUAGE
ISSN 0264-0198  Vol. 29  2010  págs. 1 - 15
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 8  2010  págs. 232 - 233
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: ANTIQUARIES JOURNAL
ISSN 0003-5815  Vol. 90  2010  págs. 131 - 138
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 57  Nº 2  2010  págs. 195 - 196
A literary criticism examining the use of the word "doolie" in the poem "The Testament of Cresseid," by Robert Henryson, is presented. The author notes speculation by scholars such as Douglas Gray and Denton Fox regarding the meaning of the word and how the etymology of the word reveals its relation to other words from Scottish Gaelic dialects that mean "dismal." The author suggests that Henryson's use of the word reveals the time frame for changes in the Gaelic language
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: SCOTTISH GAELIC STUDIES
ISSN 0080-8024  Vol. 26  2010  págs. 1 - 3
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 57  Nº 4  2010  págs. 475 - 476
The article discusses possible definitions and etymologies of the word "doif" as it appears in the poem "Testament of Cresseid," by Scottish poet Robert Henryson. The author believes the word could be a loan word from the Middle Irish or Old Norse languages. Emphasis is given to the anglicization of words in Scottish poetry. A possible translation of the word is "dull"
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: VOPROSY FILOLOGII
ISSN 1562-1391  Vol. 3  Nº 36  2010  págs. 51 - 56
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: THE WELSH JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS HISTORY
ISSN 0967-3938  Vol. 5  2010  págs. 79 - 83
The article presents an examination into the early church history of Wales, focusing on disparate accounts regarding St. Kea, Archbishop of Colfa in the late-5th century and various sites and locations associated with him. Details are given describing the folklore and historical narratives surrounding St. Kea's hermitage in Colfa. Further investigations are provided regarding medieval drama associating St. Kea with "Colan," which the author asserts is the same as Colfa. Connections between St. Kea and St. David of Wales are also discussed
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: HOUSMAN SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN 0305-926X  Vol. 36  2010  págs. 154 - 157
The article examines the interpretation and meaning of the term Corve in the poem "A Shropshire Lad XXXVII," by A. E. Housman. According to the author, of the river-names used in the poem, the names Teme and Severn are distinguished as Celtic but the exception has been the Corve since it is located at the south of Wenlock Edge. It also discusses the link between the Corve and the term corbibus in the Juvenal and the idea that the term reflects the early history of Shropshire, England
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Britons at Lickey
Revista: TRANSACTIONS OF THE WORCESTERSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY
ISSN 0143-2389  Vol. 22  2010  págs. 83 - 86
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: TRANSACTIONS OF THE CAERNARVONSHIRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
ISSN 0144-0098  Vol. 71  2010  págs. 29 - 31
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: The Name of Lerryn
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 8  2010  págs. 240 - 241
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 57  Nº 4  2010  págs. 474 - 474
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES FOR SOMERSET AND DORSET
ISSN 0029-3989  Vol. 36  Nº 372  2010  págs. 429 - 430
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 57  Nº 4  2010  págs. 474 - 475
The article offers poetry criticism of the poem "In Secreit Place This Hyndir Nycht" by Scottish William Dunbar. The author analyzes the use of the word mychane in the line "With moderis mylk yit in your mychane," and suggests that the word is derived from the Gaelic word for abdomen, maothain. Similar Old Irish, Latin, and Scots words are also explored
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: ARCHAEOLOGIA CANTIANA
ISSN 0066-5894  Vol. 130  2010  págs. 385 - 387
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0029-3970  Vol. 57  Nº 2  2010  págs. 168 - 168
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 47  Nº 1  2010  págs. 155 - 162
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: NORTHERN HISTORY
ISSN 0078-172X  Vol. 47  Nº 2  2010  págs. 319 - 328
A map in the National Archives dated to 1531 showing part of the Fylde in Lancashire has been published on several occasions; but its relationship to another map in the National Archives has not previously been recognised. These two maps were made by the opposing parties in a dispute before the court of the Duchy of Lancaster, and may be the earliest examples of adversarial map-making in a case before an equity court. The case concerned land which had apparently long been regarded as intercommon, but which was now being claimed to be in exclusive ownership. The newly recognised map was made to illustrate recently acquired documentary evidence as to the ownership of the land in question. This map appears broadly trustworthy, and was accepted as such by the court; but the defence map seems rather to have been designed to mislead. In recent years the defence map has been regarded as evidence for the appearance of the locality concerned in the 1530s, but this study shows that it was in fact regarded by the court as unreliable, thus highlighting the need to treat all maps other than those actually commissioned by the courts themselves as partial and therefore suspect
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Revista: DEVON AND CORNWALL NOTES AND QUERIES
ISSN 0012-1681  Vol. 40  Nº 7  2010  págs. 210 - 211
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Aspects of Medieval English Language and Literature: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference of the Society of Historical English Language and Linguistics
2018  págs. 61 - 80
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Encyclopaedia of the Bible and its Reception
Vol. 11  2015  págs. 346 - 348
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Encyclopaedia of the Bible and its Reception
Vol. 9  2014  págs. 203 - 204
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Saltair Saíochta, Sanasaíochta agus Seanchais: a Festschrift for Gearóid Mac Eoin
2013  págs. 17 - 24
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Lochlann: Festskrift til Jan Erik Rekdal på 60-årsdagen: Aistí in ómós do Jan Erik Rekdal ar a 60ú lá breithe
2013  págs. 105 - 110
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Reading La3amon's 'Brut'
2013  págs. 215 - 227
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Linguistic Meetings across Borders
2012  págs. 41 - 44
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Rural Space in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age
2012  págs. 295 - 312
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  Formal and historical approaches to celtic languages
Vol. 7  2011  págs. 143 - 151
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  The Arthur of Medieval Latin Literature: the Development and Dissemination of the Arthurian Legend in Medieval Latin
2011  págs. 26 - 41
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  War and peace: critical issues in European societies and literature 800-1800
2011  págs. 155-169
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Welsh Studies
Libro:  Handbook of medieval studies: terms, methods, trends
Vol. 2  2010  págs. 1409 - 1417
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Título: Gaelic vocabulary
Libro:  The Edinburgh companion to the Gaelic language
2010  págs. 218 - 228
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  The Encyclopaedia of the Medieval Chronicle
Vol. 1  2010  págs. n - nn
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
Libro:  L' imaginaire de la parenté dans les romans arthuriens: (XIIe - XIVe siècles): colloque international, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale de l'Université de Poitiers (12 et 13 juin 2009)
2010  págs. 125 - 130
Autores: Breeze, Andrew Charles
2020